WNC Responds to Society of Professional Journalists’ national Ethics Committee

WNC Responds to Society of Professional Journalists’ national Ethics Committee

The Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) national Ethics Committee issued a statement on May 8 criticizing the Washington News Council’s “virtual hearing” by a Citizens Online News Council. The committee’s statement was a group effort overseen by Andy Schotz, chair of the SPJ Ethics Committee, who interviewed me over the phone.
We also exchanged emails. Schotz invited me to respond. The SPJ statement is below, with my responses (in blue) after each paragraph. Schotz promised to post my response on the SPJ Ethics Committee’s blog site. The WNC invites the SPJ Ethics Committee to engage in a public dialogue about these important issues of media ethics and accountability. I’ll post their response here. [Read more...]
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WNC’s Virtual Hearing Results are IN!

In an unprecedented “virtual hearing” on a complaint from Secretary of State Sam Reed against KIRO7 Eyewitness News, dozens of people voted and added comments.
The votes were largely critical of KIRO and upheld Reed’s complaint. Of about 100 people who voted online, only a few defended KIRO while most supported Reed’s position.

See the Vote Results and Comments.

NOTE: If KIRO responds, we’ll post their full response.

Reed and his staff decided not to seek a full News Council hearing on the complaint, declaring that they “see little value in continuing to bang our head against the wall, knowing that KIRO will boycott the proceedings and will not acknowledge errors in fact and in tone, much less fix the problems.”

As an alternative to a public hearing, the WNC invited citizens to view the stories, read the complaint, then vote and comment in a “virtual hearing” as a Citizens Online News Council. The deadline was April 30, during national “Media Ethics Week” sponsored by the Society of Professional Journalists.

The complaint concerned two stories aired on KIRO (Oct. 15 and Nov. 3, 2008) about alleged voting violations.
You can download a copy of the complaint (page 1 & page 2)and Same Reed’s letter to the Washington News Council

Nov. 3 story on deceased voters:

YouTube Preview Image

Download a transcript of this story

Oct. 15 story on felon voters:

YouTube Preview Image

Download a transcript of this story

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Public Votes in “Virtual Hearing” on Sam Reed vs. KIRO7 Complaint

In an unprecedented “virtual hearing,” dozens of people voted and commented as part of a Citizens Online News Council on a formal written complaint from Washington Secretary of State Sam Reed against KIRO7 Eyewitness News.

The votes were largely critical of KIRO7 and upheld Secretary Reed’s complaint. Of nearly 100 people who voted online, only a few defended KIRO. The rest supported Reed’s position.

A key part of the Washington News Council’s mission is to encourage citizen participation in public discussion of media ethics and accountability. This online vote advances that goal.

The WNC invited citizens to vote on the questions that the full News Council would have considered had this case gone to a hearing. (For a full list of the questions, total votes and collected comments, plus complete background information, see HERE)

The voting deadline was April 30, 2009, during national “Media Ethics Week” sponsored by the Society of Professional Journalists. Votes came from statewide, with a few from other states. Some votes were from journalists. Most voters added comments. Examples:

“KIRO TV’s News Director, Reporter, and General Manager should come clean and be a good example by admitting that a journalist made a mistake.”

– Ken Hatch, former president, KIRO TV

“KIRO was clearly cautioned about checking its facts, but seemed more driven by getting a sensational story than by being accurate.”

– Mike Flynn, former publisher, Puget Sound Business Journal

“This case deserves coverage in media journals to show how careless coverage easily misleads.”

– Arnold Ismach, former dean, University of Oregon Journalism School

“KIRO ignored much of the factual information presented in the meetings with the Secretary of State and reported only what they wanted to report to make the story more inflammatory.”

– Roy Kimbel, Center for Ethical Development, Tacoma Community College

“I would say that the damage was done to the state – and the democracy in which we live.”

– Mike Kittross, editor, Media Ethics magazine

When Reed filed his complaint with the Washington News Council, he contended that two KIRO stories aired last fall were “factually incorrect, incomplete, misleading, sensationalized, inflammatory and unfair.” Reed and his staff had previously asked KIRO to air corrections and remove the stories from its website. When KIRO declined, Reed turned to the WNC.

The WNC accepted Reed’s complaint and hand-delivered it to KIRO. After they received the complaint, KIRO top management met with Reed and his staff in Olympia. They still refused to air corrections, but offered to remove the stories from their website if Reed agreed not inform the News Council or the public. Reed declined that offer. Later, KIRO removed the stories without informing Reed or the WNC, and without admitting any inaccuracies. Reed decided not to seek a public WNC hearing, so an online “virtual hearing” was proposed to hear citizens’ views.

The WNC invited KIRO to respond to Reed’s complaint, but the station did not return phone calls or emails, or answer a letter that accompanied the complaint. If KIRO responds at any time to the voting results and comments, we will post the full response on our website.

CONTACT: John Hamer, Executive Director (jhamer@wanewscouncil.org), 206.262.9793

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How the ‘TAO of Journalism’ Can Help the News Media

Journalists are radiating angst these days, and with good reason.

A perfect storm has hit the news industry: a broken business model, loss of advertising, cancelled subscriptions, low ratings, rising costs, financial losses, a stampede to the Internet, proliferation of news sources, newsroom layoffs/buyouts, folding newspapers – and demoralized journalists.

What’s worse, many people don’t like, respect or trust journalists and media outlets anymore. They rank low in most public-opinion polls. The latest Edelman Global Trust Index found that media companies are the least trusted in this country, behind automotive, banking, energy and pharmaceutical firms.

There’s no quick fix for the woes that plague the news media – but some things could help. [Read more...]

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